Please upgrade your browser

For the best experience, you should upgrade your browser. Visit our accessibility page to view a list of supported browsers along with links to download the latest version.

Public

SoAH Research Presents: REPRESENTATION

17 February 2021 | 6pm – 8pm

This event will be live-streamed via Zoom.

We are pleased to present the first public School of Arts & Humanities Research event in 2021: REPRESENTATION, with guest speaker Ama Josephine Budge, titled An Image of Tomorrow: Reading Rotimi Fani-Kayode through the Potentiality of Intimate Ecologies.

Ama Josephine Budge is a Speculative Writer, Artist, Curator and Pleasure Activist whose praxis navigates intimate explorations of race, art, ecology and feminism, working to activate movements that catalyse human rights, environmental evolutions and troublesomely queered identities. Ama is the recipient of the 2020 Local, International and Planetary Fictions Fellowship with Curatorial Frame (Helsinki) and EVA International (Limerick), and will be researching the topic Pleasurable Ecologies – Formations of Care: Curation as Future-building. Ama is also a member of Queer Ecologies 2020, initiator of the Apocalypse Reading Room project, a recipient of 2020 Bernie Grant Micro commission funding and Lead Artist on the MycoLective project with Chisenhale Studios and Feral Practice.

www.amajosephinebudge.com

Twitter: @amjamb
Insta: @amajosephine

Registration essential via EventBrite.

The event will be held via Zoom Webinar. Please note the link and password will be sent to attendees via email.


The Representation Research Group

Asks how the critique of aesthetic representation can be related to the ongoing challenges to political representation within liberal capitalist democracies.

Looks to establish relationships between the dismantling of representational orders and the production of new models of being human and doing politics.

Participates in a materialist analysis which historicises and provincializes the ideology of aesthetic universality.

Punches holes in the canopy of human representational systems.

Takes representation seriously.

Is mostly limited to a history of cultural practices that self-describe as art.