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Tyra Tingleff

MA work

My goal is to enter the deep dub-space of an echo-box in each painting, where the temporal idea might not be literal in the execution. The paintings are novelistic rather than literary and episodic rather than narrative. The place in the work where it gets exciting for me is where the absence of language begins. The paintings produced become something we can all see, but at the same time they convey an impression of the uncertainty of reality. We can’t rely on the picture of reality that we see, because we see it mediated through the lenses of our individual eyes, and correct what we see accordingly to our past experiences. For me painting becomes a test of our own objectivity. It challenges what we regard and describe as 'real' and shows that it is a fundamentally uncertain thing. I don't want my paintings to represent one thing too clearly, so I blur things to make everything equally important and equally unimportant. I blur things to make all the parts fit. My interest in working with art comes from unnoticed disturbances where one's 'silence' is another's 'noise', and how these oppositional ways of perception can merge into a temporary understanding of something unsaid. Which for me is a force within art. How to direct a focus by cancelling the meaning of something else? A clear interest for me comes from these spots, where things meet and in the meeting points equalise each other.

Info

  • Tyra Tingleff profile image
  • MA Degree

    School

    School of Fine Art

    Programme

    MA Painting, 2013

  • My goal is to enter the deep dub-space of an echo-box in each painting, where the temporal idea might not be literal in the execution. The paintings are novelistic rather than literary and episodic rather than narrative. The place in the work where it gets exciting for me is where the absence of language begins. The paintings produced become something we can all see, but at the same time they convey an impression of the uncertainty of reality. We can’t rely on the picture of reality that we see, because we see it mediated through the lenses of our individual eyes, and correct what we see accordingly to our past experiences. For me painting becomes a test of our own objectivity. It challenges what we regard and describe as 'real' and shows that it is a fundamentally uncertain thing. I don't want my paintings to represent one thing too clearly, so I blur things to make everything equally important and equally unimportant. I blur things to make all the parts fit. My interest in working with art comes from unnoticed disturbances where one's 'silence' is another's 'noise', and how these oppositional ways of perception can merge into a temporary understanding of something unsaid. Which for me is a force within art. How to direct a focus by cancelling the meaning of something else? A clear interest for me comes from these spots, where things meet and in the meeting points equalise each other.

  • Degrees

  • BA, Fine Art, The National Academy of the Arts in Bergen, Norway, 2008; Exhange student, Fine Art:Painting, The Royal Academy of Art, Copenhagen, Denmark, 2008
  • Exhibitions

  • ”If you lay color on top of color you get black!”, Peinture et Sculpture, Copenhagen, 2013; ”Det som er, og det som kunne være”, BKS Garage, Copenhagen, 2013; Bloomberg New Contemporaries, Liverpool Biennale/ICA, Liverpool & London, 2012; Erasing Darkness, Freies Museum, Berlin, 2010
  • Awards

  • Winner, Fine Art Sholarship, Norwegian Visual Artists Association, 2011; Winner, Janson Legat Scholarship, Norway, 2011; Winner, Scholarship, Norwegian Visual Artists Association, 2008
  • Conferences

  • 'Artist's talk', Tim Zercie, Wimbledon College of Art, 2013
  • Publications

  • "Day of the dead", Agnete Bertram, by Bertram, 2012; 'Erasing Darkness', Lene B.Ørmen, Sara Sølberg, KØNST magazine, 2011