Thomas Gibson

MA work

Today death is seen not as a defining human moment but as something to be sanitised and pushed to the edges of our towns and cities. In an urban population that is ageing dramatically, it is vital for society to confront, and participate in, the process of dying as a right of passage and the final phase of living.


This thesis proposes an urban architecture which enables a contemporary form of end-of-life care within the city and facilitates an individual’s right to determine the manner and location of their own death.


Info

  • MA Degree

    School

    School of Architecture

    Programme

    MA Architecture, 2012

    Specialism

    ADS2

  • Today death is seen not as a defining human moment but as something to be sanitised and pushed to the edges of our towns and cities. In an urban population that is ageing dramatically, it is vital for society to confront, and participate in, the process of dying as a right of passage and the final phase of living.


    This thesis proposes an urban architecture which enables a contemporary form of end-of-life care within the city and facilitates an individual’s right to determine the manner and location of their own death.


  • Degrees

  • MA, Architecture, University of Edinburgh, 2009; Foundation Art and Design, University of the Arts London, 2004
  • Experience

  • Architectural assistant, Haworth Tompkins Architects, London, 2010–11; Architectural assistant, Toh Shimazaki Architecture, London, 2009–10; Architectural assistant, Real Architecture, Ho Chi Minh City, Vietnam, 2008–9