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Patricia Voskova

MA work

The core of my practice is drawing. It has immediacy that captures the flow of everyday life and events. I make observational drawings as well as drawings from imagination. I'm interested in how these two types of drawing juxtapose the notion of the visible and invisible, the notion of control and chance, the notion of stillness and movement. To draw from observation means not only to copy the subject, but to be as truthful to the subject as possible. When one observes, one has got something concrete to hold on to, for example a model, landscape or a still life. One constantly looks back and forth, making decisions, making mistakes, correcting them. Reasoning plays a big role. One needs to make decisions about what medium depicts the subject best, what paper is the most suitable, how to apply light/shade relationship. To draw from observation means to make outward things or worlds become inward. Drawing from imagination is the opposite process. There are things, which I am vaguely aware of. They are slowly entering my mind where they are gradually taking shapes. I begin to put them on paper. Of course, it is never quite what I’ve imagined. It never fulfills the image in my head. It cannot. That is the beauty of it. Drawing from imagination is about the journey, the finished drawing rarely matters. It is about flux of energy, ideas or visions. At the moment of the strongest concentration I follow this energy.

Info

  • MA Degree

    School

    School of Humanities

    Programme

    MA Printmaking, 2013

  • The core of my practice is drawing. It has immediacy that captures the flow of everyday life and events. I make observational drawings as well as drawings from imagination. I'm interested in how these two types of drawing juxtapose the notion of the visible and invisible, the notion of control and chance, the notion of stillness and movement. To draw from observation means not only to copy the subject, but to be as truthful to the subject as possible. When one observes, one has got something concrete to hold on to, for example a model, landscape or a still life. One constantly looks back and forth, making decisions, making mistakes, correcting them. Reasoning plays a big role. One needs to make decisions about what medium depicts the subject best, what paper is the most suitable, how to apply light/shade relationship. To draw from observation means to make outward things or worlds become inward. Drawing from imagination is the opposite process. There are things, which I am vaguely aware of. They are slowly entering my mind where they are gradually taking shapes. I begin to put them on paper. Of course, it is never quite what I’ve imagined. It never fulfills the image in my head. It cannot. That is the beauty of it. Drawing from imagination is about the journey, the finished drawing rarely matters. It is about flux of energy, ideas or visions. At the moment of the strongest concentration I follow this energy.

  • Degrees

  • BA (Hons), Illustration & Animation, Kingston University, 2011
  • Experience

  • Teaching placement, University of Liverpool, 2013; Teaching placement, University of Winchester, 2012; Lithography assistant, Royal College of Art, London, 2011–12
  • Exhibitions

  • Parallax, Cafe Gallery, London, 2013; I took the lift to the 6th Floor, Cafe Gallery, London, 2012; D&AD; New Blood, Truman Brewery, London, 2011; Highs for your Eyes, The Red Gallery, London, 2011
  • Awards

  • D&AD; New Blood, Illustration, D&AD; Best New Blood, 2011