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Moira Lovell

MPhil work

Consuming intimacy: looking, touching and performing with the female entrepreneur

A young woman is reflected in a mirror, she is displayed in stasis, with her right arm stretched out, addressing her mobile phone with intense concentration. Her self-representation clearly signifies the early twenty-teens, an age when cameras converged with phone technology, and selfie-making became a phenomenon. Behind her hangs crushed velvet curtains, an ironing board rests against a wall, and clothing is strewn upon a double bed. This is a domestic scene; a bedroom - a feminine space with reflective furniture, a twinkly chandelier and silvery décor. The young woman wears a black leather jacket, and a pair of white knickers.

This research responds to images created by the female entrepreneur. Whose selfies, published on e-commerce websites, bear out an ‘up for it’ sexual agentic identity, inspiring feelings of familiarity and connection. Through the blurring the boundaries between public and private life, the selfies elicit a frisson. Seemingly enabling closeness of observation and intimate knowledge between strangers. Yet, this is of course an illusion. And what we are actually looking at is a flat backlit surface. Bodies rendered on a screen. A depiction of a thing and not the thing itself. A substitute for the ‘real’. And yet, the researcher suspends her belief and looks beyond the flatness of the image to the thickness of the thing implied.


Lovell’s research asks:


How can the photographic states of looking, touching and performing transgress the boundaries between public and private; self and another; real and imagined; 2d and 3d?

Info

  • MPhil

    School

    School of Arts & Humanities

    Programme

    Photography, 2017–2021

  • Consuming intimacy: looking, touching and performing with the female entrepreneur 

    A young woman is reflected in a mirror, she is displayed in stasis, with her right arm stretched out, addressing her mobile phone with intense concentration. Her self-representation clearly signifies the early twenty-teens, an age when cameras converged with phone technology, and selfie-making became a phenomenon. Behind her hangs crushed velvet curtains, an ironing board rests against a wall, and clothing is strewn upon a double bed. This is a domestic scene; a bedroom - a feminine space with reflective furniture, a twinkly chandelier and silvery décor. The young woman wears a black leather jacket, and a pair of white knickers.

    This research responds to images created by the female entrepreneur. Whose selfies, published on e-commerce websites, bear out an ‘up for it’ sexual agentic identity, inspiring feelings of familiarity and connection. Through the blurring the boundaries between public and private life, the selfies elicit a frisson. Seemingly enabling closeness of observation and intimate knowledge between strangers. Yet, this is of course an illusion. And what we are actually looking at is a flat backlit surface. Bodies rendered on a screen. A depiction of a thing and not the thing itself. A substitute for the ‘real’. And yet, the researcher suspends her belief and looks beyond the flatness of the image to the thickness of the thing implied.

    Lovell’s research asks:

    How can the photographic states of looking, touching and performing transgress the boundaries between public and private; self and another; real and imagined; 2d and 3d?

     

  • Degrees

  • MA Gender, Media and Culture, Goldsmiths University, 2015; MA Photography, London College of Communication, 2006; BA (Hons) Photography, Kent Institute of Art and Design (now known as University for the Creative Arts), 1999
  • Experience

  • Director of Curriculum and Quality, Open College of the Arts, 2018; (Distance Learning) Tutor in Photography, Open College of the Arts, 2005 - to date