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Melina Xenaki

MA work

The Sword of the Moon, Blurred Lines

Inspired initially by the beauty of Ancient Greek Geometric Period motifs – the triangles,  zigzags, checkerboards and lattices – I found them repeated in the ethnographic art of different tribes from Africa to Peru and in the work of the Aboriginals of Australia. Looking back to the Upper Paleolithic era, with patterns scratched on rocks and painted in caves, I begun to wonder, ‘What is it that makes humans attracted to these patterns and why are they so universal?’

My research lead me to study the entoptic phenomena: the way the very architecture of our brain allows us to experience these visual patterns and the way humans interpreted and integrated them into their religions and art. I have recreated the basic elements, using a variety of printing techniques, translating these patterns onto the ceramic surface. My material investigation involved a series of experiments as I developed numerous glazes, which react to the oxide pigments and fluxes I use for screen-printing, producing striking effects. What I enjoy most is the interaction between my intention, my line and the influence of the ceramic materials during the firing process.

Info

  • Melina
  • MA Degree

    School

    School of Humanities

    Programme

    MA Ceramics & Glass, 2014

    Specialism

    Ceramics

  • Inspired initially by the beauty of Ancient Greek Geometric Period motifs – the triangles,  zigzags, checkerboards and lattices – I found them repeated in the ethnographic art of different tribes from Africa to Peru and in the work of the Aboriginals of Australia. Looking back to the Upper Paleolithic era, with patterns scratched on rocks and painted in caves, I begun to wonder, ‘What is it that makes humans attracted to these patterns and why are they so universal?’

    My research lead me to study the entoptic phenomena: the way the very architecture of our brain allows us to experience these visual patterns and the way humans interpreted and integrated them into their religions and art. I have recreated the basic elements, using a variety of printing techniques, translating these patterns onto the ceramic surface. My material investigation involved a series of experiments as I developed numerous glazes, which react to the oxide pigments and fluxes I use for screen-printing, producing striking effects. What I enjoy most is the interaction between my intention, my line and the influence of the ceramic materials during the firing process.

  • Degrees

  • BA Three Dimensional Design (Ceramics), University for the Creative Arts, Farnham, Surrey
  • Experience

  • Organiser and tutor, Two-day introductory workshop in ceramics, Access to Higher Education Diploma in Art & Design, 2011; Exhibitions assistant, Burgh House, Hampstead, 2011; Organiser and tutor, Two-day ceramics workshop, Association of Eressians, O Theofrastos
  • Exhibitions

  • Anima, Asylum, Caroline Gardens Chapel, London, 2013; Work-in-progress Show, Royal College of Art, London, 2014; Work-in-progress Show, Royal College of Art, London, 2013; New Designers Exhibition, Business Design Centre, London, 2012; UCA Degree Show, Farnham, 2012; Expressions, Pizza Express, Farnham, 2012; Art in Clay, The Maltings, Farnham, 2011; Touch Me, The Barn, Farnham, 2011
  • Awards

  • Licentiate Award, The Society of Designer Craftsmen, 2012; Second place, Architectural and Furniture Category, Pewter Competition, 2011