Please upgrade your browser

For the best experience, you should upgrade your browser. Visit our accessibility page to view a list of supported browsers along with links to download the latest version.

Kit Webb

MA work

Air and Its Lessness

To write on air—that which surrounds us, from which we draw breath, now thick with our emissions, our signals, our machines—might seem to call for a writing that can convey our immixture, and be at once convoluted and diffuse. That, at least, is the suggestion of its more recent surveyors, whether in Steven Connor's cultural history of air, or Peter Sloterdijk's philosophy of our airborne condition.

But to write on a diminished air—air that's no longer breathable, whether because it's too thin or too vacuous, too clogged or cloying—may then suggest other modes. Beginning with Robert Boyle's first experiments manufacturing a vacuum in the seventeenth century—drawing from his apologies, scruples, suspicions and digressions—this project engages with and trials the different forms of writing air's lessness has and might solicit.

Info

  • Kit Webb
  • MA Degree

    School

    School of Arts & Humanities

    Programme

    MA Critical Writing in Art & Design, 2018

  • Two years at the RCA led me to fret over: what I'm missing (blind spots, scotomata, Cameron Rowland's procured objects); cruel cinema, crueller writing (through Don Levy's Herostratus); views from a helicopter, ways critics comb and scour; the wallpaper in King's Cross Yumchaa's toilets; vacuity (or, more generally, any air not fit for breath), parentheses, splinters, scruples, apologies; words wrenched, syntax mangled, fumblings with form; (and while I've been fretting) all that I've missed.

  • Degrees

  • BA English Literature, University of Oxford, 2013
  • Experience

  • Editor, Propland: Reprogramming Television Centre, Royal College of Art, 2018; Curator, The Dodo and The Seed, Siobhan Davies Studios, London, 2017