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Jessie Lingham-French

MA work

Title of dissertation: Redesigning Science and Technology for Post-War Britain: How Was Science Represented at the Festival of Britain, 1951?

The design of science can be analysed through the attempts to popularise science through imagery, literature, graphics, models and architectural spaces. The simplification of scientific matter through various design ‘modes’ took place in order to convey complex empirical study and theoretical ideas to the lay-public. The Festival of Britain provides a unique instance in British history in which a general understanding of science was realised on a grand scale, and its importance for everyman anticipated. A close contextual reading of the role of science in the political and social sphere of the period provides this thesis with a design history of science explained to the non-expert through design. The dissertation considers science and its existence in visual, tactile and philosophical language via three sections of the Exhibition. These elements are: the walk-in and interactive displays, the catalogue guide to the exhibit, and the future of scientific discovery display including the Grey Walter robotic tortoises.


Info

  • MA Degree

    School

    School of Humanities

    Programme

    MA History of Design, 2011

  • Title of dissertation: Redesigning Science and Technology for Post-War Britain: How Was Science Represented at the Festival of Britain, 1951?

    The design of science can be analysed through the attempts to popularise science through imagery, literature, graphics, models and architectural spaces. The simplification of scientific matter through various design ‘modes’ took place in order to convey complex empirical study and theoretical ideas to the lay-public. The Festival of Britain provides a unique instance in British history in which a general understanding of science was realised on a grand scale, and its importance for everyman anticipated. A close contextual reading of the role of science in the political and social sphere of the period provides this thesis with a design history of science explained to the non-expert through design. The dissertation considers science and its existence in visual, tactile and philosophical language via three sections of the Exhibition. These elements are: the walk-in and interactive displays, the catalogue guide to the exhibit, and the future of scientific discovery display including the Grey Walter robotic tortoises.


  • Degrees

  • BA (Hons), Philosophy, University of East Anglia, 2008
  • Experience

  • Picture researcher/design assistant, Jawbone Press, London, 2008-9; Archivist, The National Trust, London, 2009; Picture researcher (internship), Phaidon, London, 2009