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Jessica Steel

MA work

LINE + ROTATE

[minimum maximum] 


My approach to making is to use the minimum number of parts to create the greatest variety of forms.

I start a project with a small set of components, and process them in a way that will allow diverse iterations and a continuously changing output. This method is what drives me, and my practice. It’s a productive and satisfying way to make objects.


‘½ + ½ = 3’


These pieces start life as ‘halves’ rather than ‘wholes’.

There are 2 components (a top or a bottom half) that complete 1 form.

 

Simply put, these halves can be paired together, or each individual half can be doubled up with itself. This method gives 3 potential forms using 2 parts. This is preferable to designing 1 complete object.

 

More components (halves) multiply the amount of possible forms exponentially. This essentially iterative process has encouraged experimentation with unexpected combinations and compositions.

 

My glazing technique follows a similar path. In this collection I explore a great range of surface qualities, yet only make use of three glaze recipes in total. Like my ‘form halves’, the glazes are applied in alternating pairs. The glazes I use were developed from scratch during my studies at The Royal College of Art.

 

To show their best characteristics, the forms are designed to allow the glazes to settle, pool, drape, suspend or run. This gives an extremely ‘juicy’ range of results, showing constant consideration of the form-glaze relationship.

 

Precise porcelain forms are transformed into molten and colourful objects. The detailing of each piece is highlighted. Applying the glazes in different pairs and in varying thicknesses allows for a continuously growing library of surface qualities.


 

Info

  • MA Degree

    School

    School of Humanities

    Programme

    MA Ceramics & Glass, 2017

  • 1/2 + 1/2 = 3  [minimum maximum]

    My approach to making is to use the minimum number of parts to create the greatest variety of forms.

    I start a project with a small set of components, and process them in a way that will allow diverse iterations and a continuously changing output. This method is what drives me, and my practice. It’s a productive and satisfying way to make objects.



  • Degrees

  • BA Decorative Arts, Nottingham Trent University, 2012
  • Awards

  • The Charlotte Fraser Prize 2017