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Hemya Moran

MA work

THE COMMONLANDERS

During the passing year I've immersed myself for secluded periods of time, in the lives of people I've spotted in my daily surroundings and approached, having seen in them emblems of innocence and utopian living. I moved in with them, sometimes only for a few hours and more often for several days, immediately embracing and participating in their most intimate rituals, videotaping our interaction discretely and sometimes candidly.

I then came back for a second visit, this time to reenact frozen scenes extracted from the surveillance material I've collected. In this way I was able to facilitate the conditions that enabled me to capture the appearance of complicity between us. On several occasions, after this was done, I would suggest that we switch roles, requesting to be staged and photographed by them or their friends or relatives. With some, I've repeated this process once every few months. With others the encounters were brief and singular.
This process and its photographic results constitute another facet of my inquiries regarding the intimacy and authenticity of reenactment, occupying a contradictory position both distant, and involved, repulsed and attracted, belonging and alone; experiencing both empathy and a struggle for domination.

People in capitalist societies, especially postmodern societies, have replaced real ties and connections with symbols and signs. As a result, we experience the simulacra of reality instead of reality itself.

In each of these captured encounters, lies a tension between existing romantic imagery, reality and reenactment. As my photographs go on to have a life of their own in the image realm, they themselves get swallowed up and incorporate into the online image bank, further complicating their slippery relationship with reality.
 
 

Info

  • Profile Photo
  • MA Degree

    School

    School of Humanities

    Programme

    MA Photography, 2014

  • My initial interest in photography revolves around the personal photo album and the decisive common ground between its parts, reflecting with each fragment a further assurance of the collector's ideology.

    The difference between a private and a public digital image blurs due to mutual assimilation. The private moment is forever afflicted by the photographic consciousness.

    With these acknowledgements as my venture point, I explore and process both fictive anda documentary visual sources, extracting what I perceive as images of idealised intimacy. Their reenactments serve in the fabrication of an autobiographical image collection. Acts of presentation, rather than representation, enable me to examine interpersonal themes and questions of identity.

    During the passing year I've immersed myself for secluded periods of time, in the lives of people I've spotted in my daily surroundings and approached, having seen in them emblems of innocence and utopian living. 

    I moved in with them, sometimes only for a few hours and more often for several days, immediately embracing and participating in their most intimate rituals, videotaping our interaction discretely and sometimes candidly.

    I then came back for a second visit, this time to reenact frozen scenes extracted from the surveillance material I've collected. In this way I was able to facilitate the conditions that enabled me to capture the appearance of complicity between us. On several occasions, after this was done, I would suggest that we switch roles, requesting to be staged and photographed by them or their friends or relatives. With some, I've repeated this process once every few months. With others the encounters were brief and singular.

    This process and its photographic results constitute another facet of my inquiries regarding the intimacy and authenticity of reenactment, occupying a contradictory position both distant, and involved, repulsed and attracted, belonging and alone; experiencing both empathy and a struggle for domination.

    People in capitalist societies, especially postmodern societies, have replaced real ties and connections with symbols and signs. As a result, we experience the simulacra of reality instead of reality itself.

    In each of these captured encounters, lies a tension between existing romantic imagery, reality and reenactment. As my photographs go on to have a life of their own in the image realm, they themselves get swallowed up and incorporate into the online image bank, further complicating their slippery relationship with reality.

  • Degrees

  • BFA Photography ,Bezalel Academy of Art and Design, Jerusalem, 2006-10
  • Experience

  • Freelance photographer, 2008-present; Deauville Planche(s) Contact 2013 Residency, Deauville, France, 2013; Visiting lecturer, University of Brighton, 2014
  • Exhibitions

  • Intimate strangers, solo exhibition, Arts Hall HaBama, Herzliya, Israel, 2013; Splinter Photo Fair at the Michael Hoppen Gallery , London, 2013; Photo Off, la Bellevilloise, Paris, 2013; Deauville Photography Festival - Planche(s) Contact 2013 Residency, Deauville, France, 2013; LABEL: The Great British Art Debate, Tate Britain, London, 2012; Sotiri 2011 International Competition for Young Photographers, Intimate Propaganda: Family Photographs, Tirana, Albania, 2011; Fresh Paint Art Fair, Tel Aviv, Israel, 2011; Bezalel in the Port, Ashdod Museum of Art, Ashdod, Israel, 2010
  • Awards

  • Kenneth Lindsay Scholarship ; Shortlisted and nominee, European Prize, 2013; Second Prize. Sotiri 2011, International Competition for Young Photographers, Tirana, 2011
  • Publications

  • Science & Fiction, Oliver Richon and Rut Blees Luxemburg, Black Dog Publishing, 2014; Planche(s) Contact catalogue, Patrick Remy and the city of Deauville, 2013; Frdrique Chapuis, Telerama sortir 3327, 2013; Daniel Rauchwerger, Ha'aretz Newspaper, Galleria Supplement, 2011; Ruthie Kadosh, Ma'ariv Magazine, 2011; Hilla Shkolnik-Brener, Tel Aviv City Mouse Magazine, 2010; Ramat Rachel, artist book, self-published, 2009