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Harry Pilkington

MA work

Title of dissertation: All-In-One Masculinity — The Overall: Work, Sex and Power


‘A new suit of overalls has among its beauties those of a blueprint: and they are a map of a workingman.’

— James Agee


‘I once spoke to a guy who liked to lock his normal clothing away for the weekend and be forced to wear his dirty overalls until Monday morning.’

— Mark, coveralls.co.uk


This dissertation seeks to establish the overall as the definitive masculine garment of the twentieth century — a uniquely static yet mutable sartorial symbol containing a complexity of meaning by virtue of its manifold appropriations and interpretations over the period.


From its origins as workwear, the garment comes to be appropriated as a model for both utopian and dystopian dress, a tool for political messaging, the chosen ‘uniform’ for artists across a century, a recurring motif within contemporary fashion and a piece of clothing that continues to be admired by many, to the point of obsession.


Info

  • MA Degree

    School

    School of Humanities

    Programme

    MA History of Design, 2011

  • Title of dissertation: All-In-One Masculinity — The Overall: Work, Sex and Power


    ‘A new suit of overalls has among its beauties those of a blueprint: and they are a map of a workingman.’

    — James Agee


    ‘I once spoke to a guy who liked to lock his normal clothing away for the weekend and be forced to wear his dirty overalls until Monday morning.’

    — Mark, coveralls.co.uk


    This dissertation seeks to establish the overall as the definitive masculine garment of the twentieth century — a uniquely static yet mutable sartorial symbol containing a complexity of meaning by virtue of its manifold appropriations and interpretations over the period.


    From its origins as workwear, the garment comes to be appropriated as a model for both utopian and dystopian dress, a tool for political messaging, the chosen ‘uniform’ for artists across a century, a recurring motif within contemporary fashion and a piece of clothing that continues to be admired by many, to the point of obsession.


  • Degrees

  • BA (Hons), English, Queen Mary, University of London, 2009
  • Experience

  • Design assistant, NI-CO, London, 2005-8; Gallery assistant, Center for the Urban Built Environment, Manchester, 2008
  • Exhibitions

  • Free Range, Truman Brewery, London, 2010