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Cristina Cojanu

PhD Work

That painting is understood as being visual cannot really be contested. Even when Duchamp introduced his disavowal of painting and the schema of the chessboard to indicate an anti-retinal strategy, the implication of visual imaginary was still in place.

Indeed the link between knowing and seeing is not only at the root of metaphysical (the desire to know is the desire to see — Aristotle) thinking itself, but persists even within the disavowal of it within Late Modernity.

My research is a speculation on the relation between an ontological understanding of the image and the ornamental. The ornamental is elaborated as a force and process for the proliferation of forms out of forms.

The arabesque is the structuring principle of this research and the figure it presents. Its revelatory force lies not in giving a schema of visual revelation, but it is touching upon a force that transforms, the very ‘plasticity’ (C Malabou) inherent in every being and image. As a double, paradoxical device the arabesque enables a play between oblique and transparent things, between what can be said or known and what cannot be said, what remains unknown —and whatever lies in between. As a figure of thought, it sets out a play of plastic and graphic imminence.

This research in painting inflects painting from within, from its relation to presence and image. Caught in this by its inflammatory auto-affection, painting explodes and de-forms, it trans-forms itself — it consciously receives and simultaneously it gives form.

Info

  • Cristina Cojanu profile image
  • PhD

    School

    School of Humanities

    Programme

    Painting, 2009–2014

  • That painting is understood as being visual cannot really be contested. Even when Duchamp introduced his disavowal of painting and the schema of the chessboard to indicate an anti-retinal strategy, the implication of visual imaginary was still in place.

    Indeed the link between knowing and seeing is not only at the root of metaphysical (the desire to know is the desire to see — Aristotle) thinking itself, but persists even within the disavowal of it within Late Modernity.

    My research is a speculation on the relation between an ontological understanding of the image and the ornamental. The ornamental is elaborated as a force and process for the proliferation of forms out of forms.

    The arabesque is the structuring principle of this research and the figure it presents. Its revelatory force lies not in giving a schema of visual revelation, but it is touching upon a force that transforms, the very ‘plasticity’ (C Malabou) inherent in every being and image. As a double, paradoxical device the arabesque enables a play between oblique and transparent things, between what can be said or known and what cannot be said, what remains unknown —and whatever lies in between. As a figure of thought, it sets out a play of plastic and graphic imminence.

    This research in painting inflects painting from within, from its relation to presence and image. Caught in this by its inflammatory auto-affection, painting explodes and de-forms, it trans-forms itself — it consciously receives and simultaneously it gives form.

  • Degrees

  • MA, Painting, Academy of Fine Arts Vienna, 2002; MA, Painting, Royal College of Art, 2008; MPhil, Philosophy, University of Vienna, 2009
  • Exhibitions

  • Arensky Orchestra/RCA Collaboration, Cadogan Hall, London, 2011; Battle of Ideas, Royal College of Art, London, 2011; Dazzleships, The Red Room, London, 2010; Aquarellhappening 2000–9, Tiroler Landesmuseum, Innsbruck, Austria, 2010
  • Awards

  • Winner, Man Group Scholarship, 2006; Sponsorship, Emerging Artists, Gesellschaft der Freunde der bildenden Künste, 2002; Runner-up , Painting, Herold Superpages Prize, 2002
  • Conferences

  • 'Limit within Image', Fragments, Openness & Contradiction in Painting and Photography, Central Saint Martins College of Art and Design, 2011
  • Publications

  • 'Limit Within Image, Image within Limit', Chris Smith, Mick Finch, Sarah Cunningham, Journal of Visual Art Practice, Intellect, 2013