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Carrie Baroças

MA work

From its earliest beginnings MGM established itself as Hollywood’s foremost purveyor of taste, sophistication and glamour. Thus, from the outset, quality of design was named supreme at MGM. This was to remain so even through a period of intense design limitations. Heavy restrictions were put on the use of new materials during the period of America’s involvement in the Second World War. Studios were constrained by law not to exceed a budget of $5,000 on the purchase of new materials per film produced. Based on this information, the main question this dissertation concentrates on is how these restrictions affected the design of sets and the backlot in films throughout this era. Re-use, or the lack thereof, is a key issue addressed throughout this body of work. This dissertation also demonstrates that although re-use in the design of films was not entirely new to MGM at this point in time, it increased tremendously as a result of necessity. This trend, which began as re-use out of need, transformed to re-use for profit in the post-war era. The final segment of this dissertation considers the backlot as a postmodern space and as a pre-cursor to Disneyland and Las Vegas. It has done so through such theoretical frameworks as Simulation, Simulacra and Hyperreality. Furthermore, the backlot is described as a complex and contradictory space where strange disjointed elements of design come together, false materials are employed in each building’s construction and most structures are mere façades.

Info

  • MA Degree

    School

    School of Humanities

    Programme

    MA History of Design, 2009

  • From its earliest beginnings MGM established itself as Hollywood’s foremost purveyor of taste, sophistication and glamour. Thus, from the outset, quality of design was named supreme at MGM. This was to remain so even through a period of intense design limitations. Heavy restrictions were put on the use of new materials during the period of America’s involvement in the Second World War. Studios were constrained by law not to exceed a budget of $5,000 on the purchase of new materials per film produced. Based on this information, the main question this dissertation concentrates on is how these restrictions affected the design of sets and the backlot in films throughout this era. Re-use, or the lack thereof, is a key issue addressed throughout this body of work. This dissertation also demonstrates that although re-use in the design of films was not entirely new to MGM at this point in time, it increased tremendously as a result of necessity. This trend, which began as re-use out of need, transformed to re-use for profit in the post-war era. The final segment of this dissertation considers the backlot as a postmodern space and as a pre-cursor to Disneyland and Las Vegas. It has done so through such theoretical frameworks as Simulation, Simulacra and Hyperreality. Furthermore, the backlot is described as a complex and contradictory space where strange disjointed elements of design come together, false materials are employed in each building’s construction and most structures are mere façades.

  • Degrees

  • BA (Hons) Art History, Theory and Criticism, University of Califorina, San Diego, USA, 2007; Diploma, Urban Design in London, New York University, USA, 2005; Diploma, 17th and 18th Century British and European Design and Decorative Art, Sotheby's Institute of Art, London, 2005ExperienceCuratorial Internship, British Film Institute,London, 2008-9
  • Experience

  • Curatorial Internship, British Film Institute,London, 2008-9; Administrative Assistant/Researcher/Cataloguer/Editor, Kadima Hebrew Academy/Belfer Folk Art Collection, Los Angeles, USA, 2007; Researcher/Education Coordinator, SANA Art Foundation, San Diego, USA, 2006-7; Internship, Stu Segall Productions, Los Angeles, USA, 2003Exhibitions Education Coordinator/ Researcher, California Native American Basketry, SANA Art Foundation, San Diego, USA, 2007; Curator, Visual Arts Department Undergraduate Work, The Waiting Room: University of California, San Diego, 2006-7; Curatorial Internship/Docent, Friedl Dicker-Brandeis Exhibit, Museum of Tolerance, Museum of Tolerance, 2003
  • Awards

  • First prize, Malcolm R. Stacey Scholarship, 2006; Second prize, Provost Honors - University of California, San Diego, USA, 2003-7