Inside

Carine Collé

MA work

QUO: Your Time

QUO is a set of persuasive time-management tools for adults with ADHD/ADD (attention deficit hyperactivity disorder). It helps them to organise executive tasks in an intuitive and playful way by reminding them of time and tasks in their working environment.

QUO helps the user to stay on track and gives him/her the motivation to keep going, even with tasks that are not so exciting. Rather than reminding the user of deadlines the QUO products consider the time allocated for the task. The software calculates intermediate check-points that help the user to accomplish each step in order to be able to finish the task in a playful and engaging way. Like a personal assistant, QUO guides the user towards his/her planned goals.

The QUO product range contains three different products at the moment. The first one is TAP, a vibrating patch. It stops the user from procrastinating and communicates the passing of time. The second product is BLINK, a task-projector. This object integrates into the user’s environment and sits on the desk like a sleeping desk-lamp, but once in a while it wakes up and reminds the user what task he/she should be doing at the moment. The third product is MISSION, a secret task messenger. It triggers the users imagination and makes every dull task become an adventure. Instead of sticking to a boring and often overwhelming to-do-list, this product frames the user’s tasks as missions that he/she has to accomplish in order to save the workplace. The missions get printed out from an inconspicuous box that sits on the office desk and prompts the user with secret missions. These thee interactive devices are like motivational coaches that interact with the users and help them to get things done by distracting them from their distraction. The underlying system evolves throughout time by exchanging the projected images or the framing of the mission in order to stay surprising and charming.


Amoeba

(Group Project with Sanya Rai and Florian Puech)

With increasing digital interactions, we are constantly bombarded with vast amounts of data. Organising all this data is hard, even though we are already processing it unconsciously.

Amoeba is the result of an experimental project that was aimed at finding new ways of navigating through large blocks of digital data. It was recently exhibited at the Work-in-progress Show 2014 at the Royal College of Art, London, and was featured on Dezeen, CNET, Gizmodo, SkyNews and many other design and technology blogs across the globe.

Amoeba records changes in three bio-parameters breathing rate, pupil size and skin conductance to analyse content by interest and presents it through a simple, interactive interface. 

Info

  • Carine Collé
  • MA Degree

    School

    School of Design

    Programme

    MA Innovation Design Engineering, 2014

  • As a child I always wanted to change the world. I still do. However, when I realised that I was not going to develop superpowers I chose design. I am interested in using design thinking to bring innovation into a social context. I see user experience as the most important aspect when developing new products or services. I enjoy designing with the end user and am fascinated by human interactions and behavioural patterns.

  • Degrees

  • BA Industrial Design, HS Pforzheim, Germany, 2011
  • Experience

  • Internship, Responsive Sports, London, 2013; In-house designer, Wahl Clipper Company, Unterkirnach Germany, 2011-12; Internship, Teams Design Esslingen, Germany, 2009; Internship, Caiman Design, Paris, 2009
  • Exhibitions

  • Work-in-progress Show, Royal College of Art, London, 2014 ; Rio Tinto Sports Innovation Show, Imperial College London, 2013
  • Awards

  • Top 10 entries, James Dyson Award, Germany, 2011; Recognition, Mia Seeger Award, Germany, 2011; Recognition, Lucky Strike Award, Germany, 2011
  • Conferences

  • 'Intuitive bookmarking with Amoeba', Wearable Technology Conference, San Francisco, July 2014 (Expected)
  • Publications

  • 'Backlift' (Bachelor Thesis), Mia Seeger Catalogue, 2011