Andrew Copolov

MA work

Along Liquid Paths

When you are surrounded in all directions by many days' worth of shifting, liquid expanse, all distance becomes incalculable. Out there your environment is always changing and always the same, and for the 1.5 million seafarers who work on up to nine-month-long contracts, this has a profound effect. These seafarers, isolated and invisible, are the custodians of the 90% of world trade that’s carried by sea. They stand watch aboard hulking vessels that chug along endlessly – crossing both national boundaries and time zones as they go. Like the pirate and the privateer, the subject of the seafarer is directly informed by the sea, and exactly how this maritime space influences the seafarer is what my project deals with. How can a redesigned container ship construct a new subjectivity for seafarers?

Info

  • MA Degree

    School

    School of Architecture

    Programme

    MA Architecture, 2019

    Specialism

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  • Does anyone still think that designing a building can be a strictly formal exercise? Surely to generate a meaningful or relevant design requires considering social, political, economic and ecological implications long before one commits index finger to mouse. But to me this is what makes architecture exciting; far from being a vacuum, it is a practice enmeshed in countless other areas of concern. 

    Recently, I've been thinking about what logistics and 'supply chain capitalism' does to the space around us. In light of that, I keep returning to the following question: how might architecture help to build solidarity in environments of globalised labour?

  • Degrees

  • BA Architecture, Monash University, 2016
  • Experience

  • Architectural assistant, Nettle Architects, Melbourne, 2014-15; Architectural assistant, Bates Smart Architects, Melbourne, 2015-17; Technical assistant, Francesco Sebregondi, 2019
  • Exhibitions

  • A New Thing, Brightspace, Melbourne, 2015