Inside

Jacqueline Lefferts

MA work

T:W:O

The future of sustainability will be in simplifying objects and processes to reduce material waste. As such, my intention is to make garments from one process, which would reduce the material waste and carbon footprint of a product. The objective of this project is to challenge and resolve issues concerning sustainability and manufacturing within the textile industry. I propose to do this by changing the way fabric and fashion are manufactured and fuse the two processes into one by utilising current technologies and a new approach to production.

Globalisation has become an unstoppable force, however, sustainability has a cultural perception of being a niche and a local market. My intention is to address these issues within the fashion and textile industry by developing sustainable and ethical products which can be mass-produced.

During my Master’s degree at the Royal College of Art I have been constructing complete garments through weaving, which do not require any further construction processes once woven, meaning sewing is not necessary. Once off the loom the garment is cut from the fabric and turned inside out leaving minimal waste. The garments are shaped through weave structure and material choice. The yarns should be synthetic so that the fabric can be cut with heat, ultimately bonding the threads together in order to stop the fabric from fraying.

These projects require equipment and materials already used in industry. I propose a new approach to designing for, and manufacturing with, these existing technologies. Specifically single repeat jacquard looms and synthetic yarns.


This is significant because it removes many manufacturing processes from the supply chain, for example: sewing, fashion garment development and finishing. This is done by merging two separate manufacturing industries into one. In addition, this methodology would reduce shipping between disparate links in the supply chain, thus reducing the carbon footprint of a product. As costs would be saved on shipping and garment construction, the industry could reinvest its resources. For example: in training highly skilled employees, spending more time on research and development for materials and design.


I have created an approach that takes two separate manufacturing industries, by constructing cloth and garment as one. This challenges cultural perspectives on sustainability and mass production, making sustainable manufacturing truly impactful. It is not suggesting a radical change of equipment or materials, but simply a more considered way of designing and making. This project improves the fashion and textiles industry by reducing material waste and the shipment of goods. I am proposing to weave and design in an intellectual manner addressing sustainability in fashion and textiles.


Info

  • MA Degree

    School

    School of Material

    Programme

    MA Textiles, 2016

    Specialism

    weave

  • Studio T:W:O  was founded during my Master’s degree at the Royal College of Art. Studio T:W:O is about progressing process and mentality in the design industry through collaborations and individual projects, while also educating and encaging the consumer. Rather than weaving flat pieces of fabric my objective is To Weave Objects that are made through one process. This is possible with standard weaving equipment and a deep understanding of woven structure. I take inspiration from the technical textile industry, who specialise in 3 dimensional woven textiles. Typically, these textiles are made for components in the automotive industry and hidden within machines and vehicles. I work in an investigative manner dedicating my research to engineered textiles, giving new applications to existing techniques.

    T:W:O as a logo connects consumers to raw materials by making their origin more tangible, showing that even synthetics come from Earth, using labels as a tool, rather than a way to evoke status.

    The objective of my work is to challenge and resolve issues concerning sustainability, ethics and manufacturing within the textile industry. I propose to do this by changing the way fabric and products are manufactured separately and fuse the two processes into one by utilising current technologies and a new approach to production. My projects suggest new approaches to designing for, and manufacturing with, existing technologies. This challenges cultural perspectives on sustainability and mass production, making sustainable manufacturing truly impactful. It is not suggesting a radical change of equipment or materials, but simply a more considered way of designing and making. Both projects improve the fashion and textiles industry by reducing material waste, a product’s carbon footprint and have the potential to greatly reduce sweatshops. I aim to weave and design with intellect and purpose.

     

  • Degrees

  • BA Textile Design, Chelsea College of Art and Design, 2012
  • Experience

  • Commission weaver, Dashing Tweeds, London, 2015; Commission weaver, Studio Leigh, London, 2015; Fabric intern, The Row, New York, 2014; Fabrics intern, Zac Posen, New York, 2013; Fabrics intern, Diane von Furstenburg, New York, 2011; Studio assistant, Suzanne Tick Inc, New York, 2013
  • Exhibitions

  • Talking Textiles, Industry City Brooklyn, New York, 2015; Chelsea 10 Alumni Show, Triangle Space, London, 2015; Texprint, Premiere Vision, Paris, 2012
  • Awards

  • TextielLab Residency 2016; Dorothy Waxman Textile Design Prize 2015; Texprint, 2012