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Charles Rickleton

Show RCA work

Major project:

Aku Tikis and the Authentic Original

Images of the moai are commonplace in contemporary visual culture. From adverts for headphones to Japanese video games, from newspaper cartoons to Internet memes they are frequently detached from their origins and appropriated as a tool of communication. Instantly recognisable and copyright-free these once spiritual objects have been plundered for their commercial value, divorced from their original function and meaning. Through 3D capture technology and this publication I am attempting to unravel the logic behind this practice of appropriation and observe the different ways in which we may experience a more complex understanding of the moai in the future.

Info

  • My practise encompasses a multi-disciplinary approach routed in research. Common themes in my work are the explorations of language, symbols, artefacts and modes of replication and representation. A major focus in my current work is an examination of the ways in which the ubiquitous statues of Easter Island, the moai, have been appropriated for various communication purposes and how we might experience these stone monoliths in the light of certain emerging technologies.

  • Previous degrees

  • BA Architecture, Glasgow School of Art, 2010
  • Exhibitions

  • 1913: Rite of Spring, 134 Renfrew Street and The Old Hairdressers, Glasgow, 2013; Physics Happens in a Dark Place, Shoreditch Town Hall, London, 2014; Brave New World, Bootsbau Gallery, Berlin, 2014; Hyperstore, Holdron’s Arcade, London, 2015
  • Awards

  • Peter Picard Travel Bursary Award 2014
Royal College of Art Royal College
of Art Graduate
Exhibition

25 June –
5 July 2015

Royal College
of Art Graduate
Exhibition